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Somewhere in the overlap between software development, process improvement and psychology

First Look: CLM 2011 RTC + RRC + RQM 3.0.1 review and screenshots

What is it?

CLM 2011 is a suite of tools making up IBM Rational Team Concert, Rational Requirements Composer and Rational Quality Manager properly integrated for what is arguably the first time. In my opinion this release is the closest to my interpretation of the original Jazz vision that IBM have delivered yet. It’s not perfect but I like the direction it’s heading in.

It’s taken me a while to write this, mainly because I’ve been very busy but also because it seemed to take some deep magic to get all of this stuff installed and running properly. But I’ve done it a couple of times now so I thought I’d post some screenshots and comments. Of course if you look back on my posts of the original RTC review you’ll see that life is harder these days already. With RTC 1 and 2 you could just download a zip, extract, run a script and you were off and away. Installation isn’t too bad… it’s not great and simple but this is a big complex suite of tools so I don’t really expect it to be trivial.

Lifecycle Project Administration

To start with, the management of projects across these separate tools has been significantly improved by the introduction of Lifecycle Project Administration which allows you to create an integrated cross tool project in one step and simply manage members and roles across them. This is a big step forward although there are still some problems in that it’s not easy to do these kind of things at scale. For example if I want to add 3 people with a set of roles to 40 projects I’m going to be doing a lot of manual clicking. In fact generally it’s not so easy to deal with project areas at scale in the Jazz toolset and that hasn’t significantly improved yet although Lifecycle Project Administraton is an important step in that direction.

Creating a new Lifecycle Project

Creating a new Lifecycle Project

A Lifecycle Project

A Lifecycle Project

Editing roles accross tool project areas

Editing roles accross tool project areas

I’m not a big fan of the navigation between project areas (linked or unlinked) as the user needs to understand the architectural relationship between personal dashboards, Change and Configuration Management (which has the RTC bits like plans, work items, source control, builds etc.), Quality Management (which has the RQM bits like test plans, cases, scripts etc.) and Requirements Management (which has the RRC bits like diagrams, UI sketches, docs, requirements etc.) to navigate the stuff in their single project. I think it’s a mistake to build the UI navigation around the architecture, I would prefer to see a unified project interface and navigation structure with the extra products adding to the project mass like aspects on a foundation. As before this becomes even more of an issue when you scale up to hundreds of projects. Incidentally, aspect orientation is how we apply practices to process kernels while still providing a seamless user experience of composed practices.

Cross (linked) project navigation

Cross (linked) project navigation

So although the three products are closer together than ever before, sharing a UI and a common architecture they still are separate products and that’s clear in terms of navigation, UI differences  and linking items between them. This is a shame for many reasons but one of the most important is that it’s still providing niche tools for separate roles, building walls between people in development teams and making cross-functional teams harder to create as individuals have to learn specific skills. These differences are not a strength, they make the whole game of software development harder.

To be fair though I’m yearning for an ideal perfect solution, CLM 2011 isn’t that idealised perfect solution but it’s a lot closer to it than anything else I’ve used!

Let’s start with IBM Rational Requirements Composer

RRC 3.0.1 is a totally different beast than RRC 1 (see my original 2008 review here) and shouldn’t be thought of in the same light as RRC1. The old version was eclipse only, badly integrated, dependent on IE and full of bugs – this version is entirely web based, deeply integrated into the Jazz platform and not dependent on IE! As for bugs, I don’t know yet but it’s actually usable which v1 wasn’t!

What it does:

  • Tracks requirements of different types with different attributes and links
  • Web based diagram editing (via browser plugin for FireFox or MSIE ), although someone used Microsoft CAB technology inside the FireFox xpi so don’t expect to do any diagram editing from linux or a mac 😦
  • Ability to produce use case diagrams, UI prototypes, UI storyboards

For me this is the first time RRC has lived up to some of my early hopes for it. I see this as a replacement for ReqPro, and indeed a replacement for DOORS in time.

Creating Requirements Artifacts

Creating Requirements Artifacts

Linking a requirement to a new implementation story

Linking a requirement to a new implementation story

Unfortunately I only use linux at home so I couldn’t take screenshots of the RRC web editor, even in a virtual machine running windows on an explicitly supported browser I can’t get the plugin to work. When I’ve used it my office environment I’ve really quite liked it though, although it’s got quite a lot of basic usability problems. I’m looking forward to when it’s more mature.

There is also a dependency/traceability tree viewer but that’s a separate download at the moment.

Next Implement something in IBM Rational Team Concert

RTC hasn’t changed that much from a user perspective, it’s still a great tool for tracking work items, making atomic multi-file change sets in parallel with continuous integration and build management. I’ve been using RTC in anger for 3 years now and still like it and think it can help drive agile benefits in development teams. Granted it’s got some issues like any tool, enterprise scalability issues and annoyances the biggest of which is the lack of cross-project queries which is practically unforgivable from my perspective. See this work item on jazz.net and demand cross-project queries from IBM!

With that said, working in Eclipse from workitems, fully using Jazz SCM and continuous build is awesome.

Edit a work item in RTC

Edit a work item in RTC

Sprint plan in RTC

Sprint Plan in RTC

Making code changes in RTC Eclipse

Making code changes in RTC Eclipse

Looking at build results in Eclipse

Looking at build results in Eclipse

Looking at Build results in the web

Looking at Build results in the web

Then Test via IBM Rational Quality Manager

I’ll admit it, I’m not a cross-functional ideal. I’m a typical developer, I’m not a tester, nor am I a test manager so I’ll leave the finer points of testing theory to others. However I do have some things to say about RQM from a cohesive logical process perspective.

In this example I’ve created a Test Case based on the pizza requirement I entered in RRC (in exactly the same way that I created the implementation story). At this point frankly I’m a little disappointed because my Test Case has been created and is linked to the requirement (good) but it has no knowledge of the implementation story that I also created from RRC.

Test Case in RQM

Test Case in RQM

Test Case link back to requirement

Test Case link back to requirement

No pre-existing link to development items

No pre-existing link to development items

The Missing Link

For me this is the missing link. I realise it’s not as a simple as their always being a related triangle of 1-1 associations between these different types of artifacts, but the link between the test and the development items should at least be suggested as the odds are fairly strong that if a requirement is developed by an bit of code the test for the requirement is likely to need to test the aforementioned bit of code. Obviously I can manually create this link but that’s not the point.

In fact this is symptomatic of the fact that these CLM tools are still separate and then integrated. There is a separation between requirements in RRC, development plan items and tasks in RTC and test plan items and tests in RQM. I have to create work items /artifacts  in each tool to represent these different things and link them all together. Which is not really what I want to do.

I don’t want to spend a lot of my time creating at least 2 items for every requirement in my product (1 dev story+tasks and 1 test case+scripts).

What I want to do is elaborate a set of requirements in a simplistic user friendly UI with nice diagrams (RRC can do this) then view that candidate backlog immediately in my planning tool and further refine it – not copy it (even in bulk) to RTC but to actually manipulate the same work items, albeit a different aspect of them, in RTC. I want testing to be an inherent part of development with quality management and assurance being just another aspect of the system. Every requirement should have quality dimensions and be a test case although I might want to add more of course.

I want to have requirements with dev tasks and tests hanging off them.

Basically I want to define something that needs to be done, plan it, do it and test it all as one high level thing. I might drop off loads of tasks, different types of tests, supporting sketches etc. but I want a holistic understanding of a development item with the ability to project different views to different types of stakeholders (customer requirements views, test professional views, management views, development views).

Some conclusions

CLM2011 is a serious step in the right direction from IBM. In my opinion Jazz always has been but it’s been suffering from too many silly little problems and a lack of meaningful deep integration (ironic considering the original mission). If I had a magic wand I would do the following feats of greatness to the Jazz platform which I believe are all necessary to turn what is a good suite of tools into a true killer software development environment.

  • all jazz tools to apply new aspects to projects rather than creating seperate project areas which then need linking and administration via LPA
  • all artifacts and workitems to be viewable as native items in any tool interface
  • all artifacts and workitems created by all three tools (and other future ones) be instantiated and linked with truly consistent UI, all taggable and commentable
  • all artifacts, scm/build elements and work items queryable via a single query engine (across linked and un-linked project areas)
  • the ability to self serve projects (without granting massive impractical rights), finer grained security and permissions control
  • parent-child change sets
  • smoother flow of work items between tool aspects rather than creating new ones with links between them
  • make RRC diagram editing work on linux – things that only work on Windows are not enterprise deployable, and if they’re browser based and only work on windows someone needs shouting at. Even a much maligned school boy shouldn’t be making this error
  • a decent reporting solution and technology

Finally , being able to capture and elaborate requirements, plan iteratively, develop code, continuously integrate with unit tests, system test and manage test plans (amongst other things!) in what feels close to a single tool is extremely powerful. If only navigation wasn’t architecturally focused this strength would be much stronger and be a killer feature for IBM and Jazz.

If they sort out cross-project querying.

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5 responses to “First Look: CLM 2011 RTC + RRC + RQM 3.0.1 review and screenshots

  1. Pingback: Screenshots of new IBM Rational Jazz products « The Mac Daddy

  2. Pingback: First Look: IBM Rational Quality Manager « The Mac Daddy

  3. Pingback: First Look: IBM Rational Requirements Composer « The Mac Daddy

  4. Pingback: RTC: How to write cross project queries « The Mac Daddy

  5. mikemacd October 11, 2011 at 9:12 pm

    Please comment and share your views!

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