Mike MacDonagh's Blog

Somewhere in the overlap between software development, process improvement and psychology

Lightweight architectural mechanisms – specification by example

In my previous post I talked about using a sketch to describe architectural structure, but the other part of a useful architectural description is it’s dynamics, best expressed as architectural mechanisms.

Mechanisms are little snippets of the architecture that address an important problem, provide a common way of doing something or are good examples of how the architecture hangs together.

Mechanisms exist within the context of an architecture, which provides overall structure for the mechanisms. I tend to use a simple architectural overview sketch to do that and then further refine the architecture, if necessary, in terms of mechanisms according to the architectural profile and (during development) the needs of my team.

Sometimes during a project the team will comment on the need to have a common way of doing something, or that they’ve uncovered something tricky that we need to consider as a more significant part of the system than our early analysis showed. In these cases it’s time to create a mechanism.

Mechanisms are great, but you don’t want to many of them, or to document and detail them too much, just enough to communicate the architecture and support maintenance efforts. Indeed writing too much actually makes it harder to communicate.

Mechanisms are best expressed in terms of their structure and behaviour, I tend to use a simple class diagram for the first and whatever seems appropriate for the second. This might be a UML sequence diagram, but I don’t really like those, instead I might use a good old fashioned activity diagram, or a flowchart with GUI mockups in the nodes. Either way I recommend limited the documentation and description, just because one flow is worth writing down to explain it the others might not be. In this way I do architectural specification by example. Once I’ve written enough about a mechanism that the rest can be inferred I stop.

The words aren’t important in this example but you can see that I try to fit the description into a fairly small concise area – that helps me focus on just the really important stuff. In the top left there’s a list titled “Appropriate for stories like:” which is an indicative list of a few things to which the mechanism is appropriate.  Next to it is some blurb that says what it’s for and the main scenarios it covers, so in the case of persistency it’s the normal query, create, edit, save & delete. There might be some notes around important constraints or whatever else is important.

I’ll then describe each important scenario in terms of it’s behaviour in whatever language or visual form makes sense. Sometimes  this is a photo of a whiteboard 🙂 Sometimes it’s text, sometimes it’s a combination of those things.

The flip side

Just like stories having a flip side which contains their acceptance tests I also like to put acceptance tests on the flip side of my mechanisms. Although many are easy to frame in terms of customer acceptance tests (e.g. Search Mechanism will have performance, consistency and accuracy acceptance criteria) some are a little harder to frame. Technical mechanism formed to provide a common way of doing something in an architecture or to express the shape and aesthetics of an architecture may feel like they only make sense in terms of the development team’s acceptance criteria, however I always make sure they relate back to a story if this is the case, otherwise I could be needlessly gold plating.

Mechanisms are best found by understanding the architectural profile initially and then by actually building the system. If the customer doesn’t have a story that will be satisfied in part by a mechanism then it probably shouldn’t be there. Even if it is shiny.

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