Mike MacDonagh's Blog

Somewhere in the overlap between software development, process improvement and psychology

A cross-project Release Burnup?

Huh?

Points are abstract and relative, comparing them across projects is like comparing apples and elephants.

Releases only make sense in themselves, let alone across project time lines so why would I want to look at a cross-project burnup? Such a thing is foolishness surely…

Well maybe not, it might be useful as an agile at scale measure, as a way of looking at the work churn in a department or other high level unit in an organisation. I’ve been pondering if there’s a way of aggregating burnup information and point burnage across teams (with distinct disjoint timelines) and thought that there might be a way.

Ideally I want to be able to show the amount of work planned within an organisational group and progress towards that scope, showing when scope goes up and down (does that ever happen?). Then I want to show progress towards that scope overall, the angle of the progress line could give me an organisational velocity – perhaps I could even add an ideal velocity that would indicate what perfect robots would to if real life never intervened (although that could be dangerous).

Aggregate burnup

First I need a way of normalising points and understanding what 100% of scope means when it can be incorporating many projects at different points in their lifecycles. Perhaps a way of doing it is considering everything in terms of percentage, after all that’s an easy thing for people to consume. To define 100% of a scope of various contributing projects is tricky since it’ll change and be dependant on their releases, continuous flows, changing scope.

A simplistic approach to this is to use a moving baseline, perhaps we can determine 100% of a projects scope as whatever it thinks it would deliver within the time area being considered (the scope of the x-axis) at 15% of it’s timeline (or whatever).

In the example above this tells me that work is consistently overplanned not just in terms of actual velocity, but in terms of idealised capacity aswell – the demand is higher than the supply. I think this could be useful for “agiley” portfolio management.

Perhaps I could start establishing a budget cycle velocity, and start limiting work planned based on empirical evidence. Ok, so no project is the same and points aren’t comparable but the Law of Large Numbers is on my side.

What do you think? Is this bonkers?

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2 responses to “A cross-project Release Burnup?

  1. Steve Handy December 11, 2012 at 11:48 pm

    I don’t think it bonkers, but I must declare an interest in the outcome 🙂

  2. Ray Ashman March 25, 2013 at 10:41 pm

    I think this is a useful chart to compare individual projects against “The Norm” Given that the spread of projects may be large, data comes from small utility projects and large complex projects then I would probably use it initially as a largely qualitative assessment until I understood the project’s natural release pattern. If you see what I an getting at?

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